Does Apple still support iPod nano 7th generation?

1st generationEdit

On September 7, 2005, Apple introduced the iPod Nano at a media event with Steve Jobs pointing to the small watch pocket in his jeans and asking, "Ever wonder what this pocket is for?"[6] Advertising emphasized the iPod Nano's small size: 40 millimetres (1.6in) wide, 90 millimetres (3.5in) long, 6.9 millimetres (0.27in) thick and weighing 42 grams (1.5oz). The stated battery life was up to 14 hours, while the screen was 176×132 pixels, 38 millimetres (1.5in) diagonal, displaying 65,536 colors (16-bit color).[7] 1, 2, and 4 GB capacities were available. On November 11, 2011, Apple announced a recall on this model of iPod nano. The recall was issued due to a battery overheat issue. This recall applied to iPod nanos sold between September 2005 and December 2006.[8]

2nd generationEdit

On September 25, 2006, Apple updated the Nano line. The second-generation Nano featured scratch-resistant, anodized aluminum casing like the earlier Mini's design; the multiple color choices mirrored those of the Mini as well. However, unlike the second-generation Mini, the button labels were grey instead of matching the Nano's casing (except for the black Nano, which had a black click wheel). The second-generation Nano featured a 40% brighter, "more vibrant" display,[9] a battery life upgrade (from 14 to 24 hours), and storage sizes doubled to 2, 4, and 8 GB models. The second generation also introduced gapless playback of audio files, along with a new search option.

The 2GB model was available in silver only. The 4 GB was originally available in green, blue, silver, or pink, and the 8 GB model was initially only available in black - red was later added for 4 and 8 GB models. Apple claimed that the second generation iPod Nano's packaging was "32% lighter with 52% less volume than the first generation",[10] thereby reducing environmental impact and shipping costs.

On October 13, 2006, Apple announced a special edition iPod Nano; Product Red, with a red exterior and 4 GB of storage. For each red iPod Nano sold in the United States, Apple donates US$10 to the Product Red initiative, while retaining the regular price.[11] On November 3, 2006, Apple introduced a red 8 GB model, due to "outstanding customer demand", again retaining the same price point of the equivalent black model.[12]

3rd generationEdit

A black 8GB 3rd generation iPod Nano.

Apple updated the Nano again with its tiny design on September 5, 2007. The third-generation Nano featured a 2-inch (51mm) QVGA (320 x 240) screen and a shorter, wider, heavier design, with new colors. New features included browsing via Cover Flow, a new user interface, video playback, and support for new iPod Games. Users had to repurchase games bought a month before the debut of the new iPod as they were not supported. The Nano was announced in a 4GB version coming in silver and an 8GB version coming in silver, turquoise, mint green, black, and Product Red. The battery lasted for approx. 24 hours on audio playback and approx. 5 hours on video playback. On January 22, 2008, Apple released a pink version of the 8GB iPod Nano.

Combining elements from previous generations of the iPod Nano, the third-generation Nano had an aluminum front plate and a stainless steel back plate. The Nano also sported a new minimalistic hold switch, similar to the iPod Shuffle's power switch, which had been moved to the bottom of the player. The 2-inch (51mm) screen had the highest pixel density of any Apple product at the time, having the same pixel count as the 2.5-inch (64mm) display of the iPod Classic.

On October 6, 2007, Apple released a firmware update (1.0.2) via iTunes that was said to improve Cover Flow and yield faster menu navigation.[13] The update was also released for the iPod Classic. On November 28, 2007, Apple released another firmware update (1.0.3) via iTunes, which included unspecified bugfixes. January 15, 2008 saw the release of version 1.1, which added support for iTunes movie rentals, music song lyrics support and included more unspecified bugfixes. Apple released update version 1.1.2 in May 2008 and version 1.1.3 in July 2008 with even more bug fixes.

4th generationEdit

4th generation iPod Nano.

At the Apple Let's Rock Event on September 9, 2008, the iPod Nano Fourth Generation was officially announced.[14] It returned to the narrow form factor of the 1st and 2nd Generation model, while retaining and rotating the 51-millimetre (2.0in) screen from the 3rd gen model. It was also thinner than the first, second, and third generation Nano, measuring 90.7 millimetres (3.57in) tall by 38.7 millimetres (1.52in) wide by 6.2 millimetres (0.24in) thick, and weighing 36.8 grams (1.30oz). It had a curved aluminum shell and glass screen (the glass screen being held in place with nothing but the shell). Apple claimed the battery would last 24 hours of music playback, and only 4 hours of video playback, compared to the 5 hours of the previous generation.

The six previous colors (silver, black, mint, turquoise, berry red, and rose pink) were replaced by silver, black, purple, light blue, green, yellow, orange, red and pink, for a total of nine, although the Product Red color was only available directly from Apple (website and retail stores). Apple marketed the new colors as "Nano-chromatic". Also added was an accelerometer which allows the Nano to shuffle songs by shaking it, the option between portrait and landscape display modes by tilting the iPod left or right, and access to Cover Flow when tilted sideways.[15] Videos, however, could only be played in landscape mode. The user interface was also refreshed, adding a more stylized look in keeping with the new hardware design. It included a new voice recording feature which started automatically when an Apple compatible microphone is plugged in. It also included the new "Genius" feature, introduced by Apple the same day. The Genius feature automatically creates playlists based on a selected song using an algorithm built by Apple.

It was additionally touted as "the most environmentally friendly iPod Apple has ever made", containing arsenic-free glass and a BFR-, mercury-, and PVC-free design. It was also claimed to be highly recyclable. The iPod Nano fourth-generation was shipped in cases similar to the second-generation ones with the clear view in the front, and is marketed in three models: 4GB (limited production to Europe only) and 8GB and 16GB. Limited quantities of an unannounced 4GB model surfaced in various markets.[16] Also, the iPod Quiz game was dropped and replaced with a Maze game which makes use of the iPod's accelerometer similarly to such games on the iPhone and iPod Touch.

The fourth generation dropped support for charging via FireWire. "This change means that any dock accessories that use the dock connector's FireWire pins to send powermany older speakers and car chargers, for examplewill not charge the fourth-generation iPod Nano."[17]

5th generationEdit

5th generation iPod Nano camera and microphone.

At Apple's September 9, 2009 event, a fifth generation iPod Nano was unveiled with reduced prices on the larger model (at the time of release, the 8GB was priced at $149 and the 16GB at $179), a larger, 56.3 millimetres (2.22in) diagonal screen (up from 50.8 millimetres (2.00in) in third and fourth generation iPod Nanos), which was also wider,[18] integrated video camera with 16 special effects, microphone, FM radio with iTunes tagging (via RDS) multiple radio regions including Americas, Asia, Australia, Europe, and Japan.

As well as continuing to support picture viewing and video playback, it also included Live Pause, a built-in pedometer, Nike+iPod Support and a speaker.[18][19] This model also had the Genius Mix feature installed.

The headphone jack and dock connector swapped locations so that the headphone jack was to the left of the dock connector. Therefore, the fifth generation iPod Nano used a different Apple Universal Dock insert than the fourth generation.[20]

The fifth generation iPod Nano had nine finishes: Silver, Black, Purple, Blue, Yellow, Orange, Product Red, Green, and Pink. All had a glossier, shinier finish than the fourth generation. Just like the fourth-generation iPod Nano, Product Red Nano was only available on the Apple Online Store and Apple Retail Store.

This generation was discontinued on September 1, 2010.

6th generationEdit

6th generation iPod Nano.

At a media event on September 1, 2010, Apple announced the sixth generation iPod Nano, which, among many new features, was designed around a high-resolution square touch-screen.[21]

The device featured a small 1.55-inch multi-touch screen with a lower resolution of 240×240 pixels but a higher pixel density of 220 pixels per inch,[22] as opposed to the larger 2.2-inch screen on the fifth-generation iPod Nano. The device had a 0.39 watt-hour battery rated at 3.7 volts, giving a capacity of 105 mAh,[23] and specified to give 24 hours of music playback on a single full charge. The device takes about three hours for one full charge. The device retained the same 30-pin dock connector as previous generations. This Nano lost the previous generation's video camera, built-in voice recorder microphone (although plugging in headphones with a built in microphone revealed a Voice Memos app) and built-in speaker, and games. It also lost support for video playback,[24] but music videos and video podcasts (vodcasts) could be synced onto the device, and the audio from them would play on the device, with a single key-frame shown on the screen.[25] It still included the Nike+iPod fitness option as well as an FM radio tuner with RDS (Radio Data System). It had a black on white screen contrast option and other accessibility options. The 6th generation iPod Nano had the same price point as the 5th generation device.

A firmware update (version 1.1) for the Nano was released on February 28, 2011. The update added the ability to change songs or pause with a double click of the sleep/wake button. It also added the ability to turn the device off by holding the sleep/wake button. The user interface was also enhanced. On October 4, 2011, the iPod Nano 1.2 update was unveiled at the Apple "Let's Talk iPhone" event at the Town Hall, 4 Infinite Loop. This update added the option to increase or decrease the size of the home buttons for easier use. The update also added a better fitness app, which had a better pedometer split into walking and running style. The update also included 16 new clock faces, which included designs like a Nixie tube clock face or an old-style clock face, and Disney-licensed designs, such as Mickey Mouse and Kermit the Frog, bringing to a total of 18 clock faces. Three more background images were also added.[26]

Although not specifically designed as one, some accessory makers produced watch bands for the 6th generation Nano, allowing it to be worn like a watch.[27] In September 2013, TUAW compared the iPod Nano to the Samsung Galaxy Gear, and considered the three-year-old model to be a "better, cheaper smartwatch" than the Galaxy Gear because of its more complete functionality in comparison,[28] and its inclusion of a headphone jack.

7th generation of iPod NanoEdit

7th generation iPod Nanos.

A 2015 model of the 7th-generation iPod Nano having the Product Red color scheme.

Apple announced the seventh and final generation iPod Nano on September 12, 2012. The (maximum) internal storage capacity has not been increased compared with the previous model but only a single, 16GB version of the seventh generation iPod Nano was announced at the product launch. Apple described it as their "thinnest iPod ever." It is 38% thinner (5.4mm) than the Nano it replaces (8.78mm), and adds the ability to use Bluetooth 4.0 wireless headsets, speakers and other devices (such as heart-rate monitors). It still included the Nike+iPod fitness option as well as an FM radio tuner which works when connected to headphones or a stereo jack. On 15 July 2015, Apple refreshed the iPod Nano, offering only 5 more subdued colours (gold, silver, blue, pink and space grey) compared to the original 7 jewel tones, in addition to the (Product) Red model. On July 27, 2017, Apple discontinued the iPod Nano, along with the iPod shuffle, making the iPod touch the last model of the iPod line.

The 7th generation featured a 2.5 inch, touch-sensitive 432x240 display at 202 PPI, Bluetooth 4.0 (with support for NIKE+ iPod wireless systems), and a Lightning connector to replace the original 30-pin dock connector. Although its software resembles the iOS user interface, it is not an iOS device. The current and final version of the iPod software for this device is 1.0.4 for the initial release model and 1.1.2 for the mid 2015 refresh model.