Conflict in Macbeth quotes

Conflict in Macbeth quotes
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Note the kinds of conflict: internal conflict takes placewithina character; external conflict takes place between the character and others: man vs. man, man vs. society, man vs. God (supernatural), and man vs. nature.

In Shakespeare'sMacbeth , there are severalmotifs(like themes)guilt, fear, ambition, and eviland the themes of...

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Note the kinds of conflict: internal conflict takes placewithina character; external conflict takes place between the character and others: man vs. man, man vs. society, man vs. God (supernatural), and man vs. nature.

In Shakespeare'sMacbeth, there are severalmotifs(like themes)guilt, fear, ambition, and eviland the themes of appearance vs. reality and good vs. evil.

A motif is:

A conspicuous recurring element, such as a...reference ...which appears frequently in works of literature.

Athemeis a main idea that an author attempts to share with the audience.

Regarding ambition, Macbeth says:

I have no spur

To prick the sides of my intent, but only

Vaulting ambition, which o'erleaps itself,

And falls on th'other (I.vii.25-28)

Power is theonlyreason he has to kill Duncan. Macbeth expresses guilt and regret when men come to the castle early the morning after the murder to get the King. Macbeth knows that Duncan will not hear their knocking, and wishes it were not so:

To know my deed, twere best not know myself. (Knock)

Wake Duncan with thy knocking! I would thou couldst! (II.ii.92-93)

Macbeth showsfearas he jumps at every noise he hears after the King's murder. How could he be so naive to think his actions would not affect him?

Whence is that knocking?

How is't with me, when every noise appals me? (73-74)

As Macbeth commits murder more often, it becomes easier. He realizes he has reached the point of no return (and Elizabethans believed that to kill a king was a mortal sin). Macbeth notes:

I am in blood

Stepp'd in so far that, should I wade no more,

Returning were as tedious as go o'er. (III.iv.165-167)

Macbeth decides that to try to try to mend his ways is useless...to move forward would be just as easy. So the bloodshed gets worse. And in this we see a major aspect of evil. When the witches tell him to "Beware Macduff," Macbeth already knows this, but decides to murder Macduff anyway. When the assassins arrive at his home, Macduff is not there, but every member of Macduff's family is murdered, as are his servants. Macbeth has also killed Banquo (his close friend) and attempted to murder Banquo's son. Macbeth has immersed himself in evil.

The once noble Macbeth is evil incarnate: unlike the honorable king Duncan was, Macbeth is a tyrant, and no one is safe from his treachery. Here we see good vs. evil, as we see again when Macduff fights Macbeth at the end.

Another theme is that of appearance vs. reality, expressed in "Fair is foul, and foul is fair," introduced by the witches at the beginning of the play (I.i.11). Macbeth appears to be loyal to Duncan; yet he kills Duncan for the sake of his ambition. When the guards are framed for Duncan's murder, Macbeth acts distraught, and kills the guards, saying he lost his mind:

Who can be wise, amazed, temperate and furious,

Loyal and neutral, in a moment? No man... (II.iii.120-121)

At the same time, Duncan's sons are accused of Duncan's murder (insinuated by Macbeth) because they disappear so quickly after their father's murder. Because they do not know who killed their father, they flee to save their own lives, but they are not guilty of murder.

"Fair is foul" is seen with the witches' first predictions. Macbeth says:

If good, why do I yield to that suggestion

Whose horrid image doth unfix myhair

And make my seated heart knock at my ribs,

Against theuseof nature? (I.iii.145-148)

What seems good in this play is often evil.

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